Art on Display

Treehouse Café features artwork from local artists rotating through our walls every two months.  We showcase all types of artwork from photography, to charcoal artists, to painting.  Here is our schedule of featured artists:

 

 

March-April, 2014: John Wood

Pastafazool, by John Wood

Pastafazool, by John Wood

 

There is a moment when we experience something and the world stops. We see a red leaf, hear a phrase of music, smell a glass of wine, taste a small piece of cheese or feel the texture of a sweater and we are absorbed by the present and into a state of appreciation and gratitude.

 

My challenge, which I believe is the challenge of most artists, is how to convey to another human being the appreciation—and often the rapture—of what I have seen or heard. All of us had the experience of seeing something in our mind’s eye and wanting to express it to someone else. In that transition between my own experience and yours, in what I present to you, lies the opportunity for frustration and sometimes despair, as well as satisfaction and sometimes joy.

 

I take great pleasure in discovering beauty in the “ordinary world,” a curtain, an old desk, a piece of abandoned metal, a lampshade. A phrase I read many years ago in an article about a coffee shop in Vienna stays with me: “this little place dignifies the ordinary.” These photographs were not taken in a distant, exotic desert or a remote mountain range but close to home. They are views of things we see every day.

 

If I am able to move you by showing you beauty in a common, everyday object, I will be very pleased.

 

May-June, 2014: Dinah Satterwhite

Blue Veined by Dinah Satterwhite

Blue Veined by Dinah Satterwhite

Aqua Fiber by Dinah Satterwhite

Aqua Fiber by Dinah Satterwhite

 

During May and June 2014, Ms. Satterwhite will be featuring her “Into the Light” series of photo metal prints. These images capture Mother Nature in a tender and otherworldly way. From landscapes and coastal scenes, to intimate close-ups — the final image only hints at its true source. These somewhat abstract images are a beautiful infusion of movement and light which leave the viewer with more art than photo, and perhaps a sense of curiosity. Even the name of each photo series intertwines nature with technology, like “Vertical Download” and “Shutter Chance.”

 

Ms. Satterwhite paints with her camera using available light and manual camera settings, often shooting 1000+ images to find the one that captures the desired emotion, color, quality, and flow of light. The images are practically “raw,” meaning that they are not altered on the computer except for contrast and dust corrections. The final version is printed on metal. Metal prints represent a new art medium for preserving photos by infusing dyes directly into specially coated aluminum sheets. They are vibrant, detailed, and luminescent, with incredible detail and resolution. The metal surface is ultra–hard and waterproof, so it’s easy to maintain and clean. And the back of each piece is on a foam float, so the piece sits about 1″ from the wall.

 

July-August, 2014: Anna Neff

Emotion, by Anna Neff

Emotion, by Anna Neff

Frisco and Friend, by Anna Neff

Frisco and Friend, by Anna Neff

 

Though I grew up in a house full of original paintings created by my mother, it wasn’t until I saw a group of painters at work trying to capture the Bainbridge Island scene of boats in the water at the docks downtown that I took my first painting class.  It was then that I began the challenge and pleasure of turning spots of pigment into a painting!

 

Living on an island and seeing each day the intersection of land and water has inspired me.  Watching the raucous and unpredictable bird life on the island inspires me.    Humans, unaware of being noticed, inspire me.

 

The magical transformation of pigment applied to a canvas becoming an image that evokes an emotion or feeling is still incredible to me after 20 years of painting.

September-October, 2014: Suzette Ruys

Mama's Chairs, by Suzette Ruys

Mama’s Chairs, by Suzette Ruys

Papa, by Suzette Ruys

Papa, by Suzette Ruys

 

Ideally painting reaches beyond daily conversations to express ideas that would be hard to wrap our brains and tongues around. For me, really good painting becomes less about slavishly accurate detail and more about perceiving and expressing the essence of the subject.

 

Good art moves beyond a physical, psychological or cerebral activity. That is what I am reaching for when I paint.

November-December, 2014: Andrew Joel Peters

Andrew Joel Peters, Las Truchas

Las Truchas, by Andrew Joel Peters

Andrew Joel Peters, Manhattan

Manhattan, by Andrew Joel Peters

 

I first found the joy of looking through a lens in 7th grade, when my Dad let me borrow his Pentax K1000 for a summer trip. By high school I had a small collection of cameras. I processed film in my bathroom, and spent late nights scanning and editing. It wasn’t until more recently though, that I realized I can put a little part of myself into each click of the shutter. Photography had always seemed like a perfectly objective chronicle. But it’s not. The camera is where I go to observe the world, and the frames I capture show how I want it to be seen.

 

I want my photos to be more than merely beautiful, or merely pleasurable. The too perfect and too pretty, while enticing at first glance, quickly bore me. Such things are like a mass market novel: after the initial hedonistic rush, they begin to feel empty, uninteresting, and formulaic. I hope my images appear, and read, more like a great book. I hope they draw you in, I hope they reward you for each further glance, and I hope they always leave a sense of wonder for what is to come.

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